THE PAINTINGS OF ANNIE WONG LEUNG KIT WAH
  PAINTINGS - FABLES & LEGENDS




GuanYin

The Chinese translation of its counterpart in Sanskrit, Guanyin is actually the Bodhisattva of Indian tradition. Legend has it that she appeared in Putuo county in Zhejiang province. Guanyin has since been portrayed as a merciful goddess, delivering people from peril and woe if they chant her name in times of trouble.

In the Buddhist pantheon, Buddha is the supreme deity and Bodhisttva ranks second. However, Guanyin has vowed not to complete the last stage of her refinement unless she has resolved all the miseries of the world. A a result of her selfless sacrifice, she has become one of the most loved deities of the Chinese, who often refer to her as the Goddess of Mercy.

According to Buddhist scripture, Guanyin was actually a prince before becoming the Bodhisattva. Prior to the Tang dynasty (618-907), statues of Guanyin in Chinese temples were mostly portrayed as males. Since the Tang dynasty, Guanyin began to take on the appearance of a woman. The female Guanyin was to become the archetype in Chinese Buddhism, usually depicted as a serene figure sitting on a dais shaped in the form of a lotus, holding a vase, a twig og willow, or a jade of fortune. She embodies gentleness, kindness and compassion, the noblest of womanly qualities. This transformation of Guanyin into a female deity reflects the amazingly creative talent of the Chinese people in assimilating elements of foreign cultures into their own and reinterpreting them in light of Chinese aesthetics.

GUAN YIN 2

設色紙本
INK & COLOUR
ON PAPER

184.5 X 95 cm , 1995